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Book Review: Passion Never Dies by Anna Durand

January 26, 2017

A Swiss Cheese of a book

 

I can only call this book Swiss Cheese because it’s full of plot holes AND cheesy as hell.

 

I was intrigued by the premise of an ancient Egyptian princess’s mummy being found intact and her somehow being revived by a modern biotech firm. I think that interesting premise is possibly part of why I’m so angry and disappointed that this book was so awful.

 

Let me just point out two of the biggest plot holes. One of these I absolutely could not get past.

 

Our protagonist, ‘Dawn’, is an ancient Egyptian princess. Egypt is in Africa. In 1500 BC, everyone residing in Egypt would have been African. Dawn is not reincarnated; she is literally revived from her mummified form.

 

So how in the HELL is she a creamy-skinned, hazel-eyed redhead??? Are you kidding me? Does the author know ANYTHING about Egypt?

 

Second incredible plot hole; Jake, our male love interest, is a grad student. Every grad student I’ve ever met is as poor as dirt and usually surviving on a diet of ramen noodles.

 

So how, then, does Jake have a getaway cache with ‘bricks of hundred dollar bills’ and enough spare money lying around to ‘hire a Gulfstream’ (and pilot, presumably) when he needs one?

 

We don’t know. It’s never explained.

 

These are not, by any means, the only plot holes in this book. Just the most incomprehensible ones. I lost track (and stopped caring) about what the hell was going on by about half-way through, and somehow managed to keep wading through the increasingly nonsensical mess until the end.

 

Passion Never Dies… but some of my brain cells have, after reading this. One star.

 

Disclaimer: I received an ARC of this book for review through ReadingAlley.

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